Ecological Marine Units Call for Collaboration

Draw from the EMU framework, connect with the EMU Science Team, and share your findings in the Esri Living Atlas of the World.


EMUs have always been a collaborative effort. From the GEO consortium commissioning the project to Esri scientists, USGS, NOAA, Natureserve, and international academic institutions providing feedback throughout the project, EMUs and their underlying insights would not be possible without valuable inputs from a large team of contributors. What has been built is only the beginning, though. Scientists across the globe are encouraged to expand EMUs with their own data that can be shared with Esri to form a more current picture of our oceans. Take advantage of pre-existing analysis. Emulate the EMU development framework. Participate in joint research. Distribute your discoveries.

Essential EMU Framework

A simple guide to model marine data

Build Your Mesh

Build Your Mesh


Construct an empty, regularly spaced 3D mesh of points from ocean surface to seafloor covering the extent of your study area.

Attach Your Data

Attach Your Data


Attribute the point mesh with in situ observations. When the in situ points are irregularly spaced, use the Spatial Join tool and specify a match option of Intersect 3D and a search radius.

Perform an Analysis

Perform Analysis


EMUs are the result of a kmeans clustering algorithm which may be repeated locally to see how a local clustering compares globally. Beyond clustering, several tools in the Measuring Geographic Distribution toolset are 3D enabled as well.

Visualize

Visualize


Use a local or global scene in ArcGIS Pro to visualize the results of your analysis. ArcGIS Pro has a rich set of 3D symbology and markers to help you visualize your analytical results.

Share Your Results

Share Your Results


Exchange insights as a 3D web scene in ArcGIS Online or package your maps and the data referenced by the layers it contains into one portable convenient file called a map package.

Prominent contributors and esteemed experts

PARTICIPANT TITLE COMPANY/AGENCY/UNIVERSITY
Roger G. Sayre Senior Scientist Land Change Science Program, United States Geological Survey, Reston, Virginia, USA
Dawn J. Wright Chief Scientist Esri, Redlands, California, USA
Sean P. Breyer Program Manager of Content Esri, Redlands, California, USA
Kevin A. Butler Spatial Statistics Product Engineer Esri, Redlands, California, USA
Keith Van Graafeiland Ocean Content Product Engineer Esri, Redlands, California, USA
Mark J. Costello Associate Professor Institute of Marine Science, University of Auckland, Auckland, New Zealand
Peter T. Harris Managing Director GRID-Arendal, Arendal, Norway
Kathleen L. Goodin Chief of Staff, Science Division and Director Marine Program, NatureServe, Arlington, Virginia, USA
John M. Guinotte Fish and Wildlife Biologist United States Fish and Wildlife Service, Denver, Colorado, USA
Zeenatul Basher Research Technologist National Climate Change and Wildlife Science Center, United States Geological Survey, Reston, Virginia, USA
Maria T. Kavanaugh Postdoctoral Scholar Woods Hole Oceanographic Institution, Woods Hole, Massachusetts, USA
Patrick N. Halpin Associate Professor of Marine Geospatial Ecology Nicholas School of the Environment, Duke University, Durham, North Carolina, USA
Mark E. Monaco Director of Center for Coast Monitoring and Assessment National Ocean Service, National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Silver Spring, Maryland, USA
Noel A. Cressie Distinguished Professor National Institute for Applied Statistics Research Australia, University of Wollongong, Wollongong, Australia
Peter Aniello Solutions Engineer now at Sandia National Laboratories, Albuquerque, New Mexico, USA
Charles E. Frye Chief Cartographer Esri, Redlands, California, USA
Drew Stephens Industry Manager, Educational Research Esri, Redlands, California, USA

Join the EMU Community on GeoNet

Discover, submit, and discuss data with likeminded colleagues; access EMU publications.