Cartographers to Converge in Washington, DC

By Eric Anderson, Cartography and Geographic Information Society

One week before the 2017 Esri User Conference (Esri UC) gets under way in San Diego, California, the Cartography and Geographic Information Society (CaGIS) will host the 2017 International Cartographic Conference (ICC) in Washington, DC. With the events being held in relative proximity (just a domestic flight apart) and in two consecutive weeks (July 2–7 for the ICC and July 10–14 for the Esri UC), mapping buffs and GIS aficionados from around the world have the opportunity to attend both conferences in one trip.

At the ICC, a biennial event organized on behalf of the International Cartographic Association (ICA), about 2,000 conference participants from more than 80 ICA member countries will take part in workshops; go on specialized tours; and see hundreds of presentations on cartographic techniques, algorithms, products, and theories. In addition to engaging in interactive learning experiences, attendees will be able to see exhibits that include the following:

  • The International Cartographic Exhibition, which showcases recent cartographic achievements from member countries and affiliates.
  • An extensive International Trade Exhibition, where commercial companies and government and academic institutions display their newest and most advanced products and technologies.
  • A display of the winning cartographic creations from young artists who participate in the 2017 Barbara Petchenik Children's World Map Competition, organized by the ICA's Commission on Cartography and Children.

Keynote speeches and technical sessions will cover a variety of topics, including interactive maps, dynamic cartography, spatial analysis, big data, sensor networks, virtual and augmented reality, and 3D mapping. Sessions will also explore historical cartography, web cartography, open-source mapping, and innovations in cartography and GIScience.

Special events on the schedule include an exhibit by internationally renowned artist Mary Edna Fraser, who flies, hikes, and boats—consulting maps, charts, and satellite imagery—to create stunning images of earth on pieces of dyed silk in the ancient art form of batik. The Library of Congress, which has one of the world's largest map collections, will also present an exhibition of historical maps.

Attendees will have the chance to go on tours of the United States Geological Survey and the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration. The social program will feature several receptions, a gala dinner, and an orienteering competition.

For more information on the 2017 ICC or to register, head to the website.