Esri Health and Human Services
GIS Conference

September 14 - 16, 2015  |  Atlanta, Georgia

Breakout Sessions



Monday, September 14

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1:30 p.m. - 2:30 p.m.

Public Health Practice

Presentation Room: Library, Lobby Level

  • Visualizing Religious Exemptions for Vaccinations Using an Interactive, Web-Based Map
  • Katherine Kendrick, Chris DuClos and Scott Pritchard, Florida Department of Health

    Clustering of persons with vaccine exemptions can threaten herd immunity and increase risks for vaccine-preventable diseases (VPD). We conducted a unique analysis to identify Florida census tracts with high proportions of religiously exempt children and developed a tool for persons to visualize the data. We used ArcGIS online to create an interactive, easily shared map. This tool helps state and county health departments target messaging and implement prevention strategies for VPDs. 

  • Using an Individualized Activity Prescription and Community Resource Map to Encourage Physical Activity
  • Christine Mettenbrink, Denver Public Health Department

    Practitioners have little time to coach overweight/obese patients on available healthy community resources. Denver Public Health conducted a pilot project to assess the usefulness of an individualized activity prescription/healthy resource map to encourage families with overweight/obese children to engage in more physical activity.


How to use Data to Create Action: Community Response to Community Data Engenders a Rapid and Focused Response

Presentation Room: Azalea, Lobby Level

Sherry French, Alachua Count Sheriff's Office and Nancy Hardt, MD, University of Florida College of Medicine

Gainesville, Florida is a university town with many health system assets and more physicians per capita than anywhere in the nation. But hospitals and offices and physicians are not the whole solution to health care access issues. Local data indicated more advanced cancer diagnoses, more deaths from diabetes, and more repeat teen pregnancy than the rest of the state. Why should a county with many assets suffer more health disparities than the rest of Florida?

To answer the question, we used hot spot mapping and reached an unexpected conclusion. Health disparities were explained in large part by their co-location with social disparities. This information allowed the community to create novel partnerships to address issues with strategic placement of services in hot spot neighborhoods. A team of people who worked on, and still continue to work on, the project will present their roles and impressions.

Participants will leave with tools and suggestions to make the same changes in their communities.


Strategic Use of Resources

Presentation Room: Ivy 1, Lobby Level

  • The Geography of PEPFAR 3.0
  • Nathan Heard and Jennifer Ward, U.S. Department of State

    In 2014, the U.S. President's Emergency Plan for AIDS Relief (PEPFAR) pivoted its strategic planning framework to a geographic approach for epidemic control. PEPFAR built a program-wide health information system which enforces a multi-level standardized geography. PEPFAR's spatial data infrastructure spans 57 countries and includes geographic coordinates for over 46,000 clinical sites. PEPFAR leverages this system for improved spatial targeting of HIV treatment and prevention services.

  • Geospatial Analyses: Efficient Allocation of Real Property and Human Capital Resources
  • Brian Holloway, DHHS FDA

    The “shifts and expansions” within the FDA's field office locations and workforce dispersion can benefit from geospatial analyses to better align the workforce within geographic areas to support the FDA’s responsibility to protect the public’s health.


Chronic Disease Management

Presentation Room: Ivy 2, Lobby Level

  • Hypertension & Food Security: Making the Connection for Policy Development
  • Bambi Bevill and Katharine VonRueden, New Mexico Department of Health

    GIS displays prevalence of hypertension, access to health foods and locations of resources for disease prevention, including the Million Hearts Initiative in New Mexico. Network analysis is used to calculate drive-time informed service areas for at risk populations. Findings are used to improve policy. Participants will see the connection between food security and hypertension, and how NMDOH promotes public health policy to expand access for chronic disease prevention and management.

  • Supporting Cancer Prevention Strategies Using Geospatial Analysis
  • Arthi Rao, Kenneth Portier and Liora Sahar, American Cancer Society

    The American Cancer Society (ACS) considers Federally Qualified Health Centers (FQHCs) as key collaborators in increasing cancer screening rates among underserved populations. Researchers at ACS mapped the geographic distribution and coverage of FQHC service areas utilizing various GIS analysis and scripting techniques. The presentation provides a roadmap of using the service area analysis towards preventive programs at ACS.


Harnessing Data and Spatial Analytics for More Effective Interventions

Presentation Room: Grand Ballroom I, Lower Lobby Level

Tanya Bigos, Esri

The Healthcare market is changing, and with those changes comes new opportunities to bridge the barriers to better population health. To improve healthcare outcomes, organizations need to plan effective interventions that improve the lives of the people they serve and the health of their communities. The first step towards improved interventions is knowing where the greatest need is and the causes of poor healthcare outcomes. This session will provide an introduction to how GIS can play an important role in targeting high risk areas, planning interventions, and determining the key drivers of poor outcomes.

3:00 p.m. - 4:00 p.m.

New Methods

Presentation Room: Library, Lobby Level

  • Using Census Demographics to Enhance Geomasking
  • Gary Kean

    To protect patient privacy and avoid the loss of data resolution from aggregation, geomasking with the “Donut Method” allows for the retention of point level data, with minimum perturbation, helping to preserve data resolution and quality.  An extension of the Donut Method has been designed, incorporating demographic data, to ensure the area encompassing the new location will be demographically similar to that of the original point.

  • Using Mean Center Analysis to Identify Fraud and Abuse
  • Chris McInnish, Alabama Medicaid Agency

    Health agencies are constantly working to find the needle in the haystack. A recent analysis to attempt to address this problem was conducted using Mean Center analysis. The mean center was then calculated for each procedure code weighted by the total amount paid. The points outside of a Standard Deviational Ellipse would represent an abnormal distribution of cost for that procedure code.


ArcGIS Field Data Collection for Health and Human Services

Presentation Room: Azalea, Lobby Level

Jared Shoultz, Esri

Health and Human Service organizations have sustained growing interest in mobile GIS applications to expedite and standardize the collection of field-based data. The ArcGIS Platform provides many out-of-the-box configurable solutions that can cut costs and leverage existing smart phones, tablets and enterprise data to produce streamlined workflows. This workshop will provide a demonstration and instructions on how to configure ArcGIS for field data collection in a connected and disconnected mode. Different scenarios and technical options will be covered using typical health and human services examples. Operations Dashboard will also be covered to show users how to provide a real-time look into the status of field operations with a variety of visualization tools.


Improving Service Delivery

Presentation Room: Ivy 1, Lobby Level

  • Exploring the Service Delivery of First Responders in the City of Perrysburg, Ohio
  • Ian Dunn, City of Perrysburg

    Efficient delivery of first responder services is a key component in reducing morbidity and mortality in a community.  The City of Perrysburg, Ohio is in the process of investigating the efficacy of our first responder service delivery.  I’ll explain how we used methods such as point density, interpolation, network analysis, and linear regression among others to explore first responder service delivery data. The methodologies presented here can be used in many other areas of public health.

  • Application of GIS to Strengthen Routine Immunization in Urban Areas, Nepal
  • Pathak Mahesh, Society for Conservation GIS Nepal (SCGIS Nepal)

    This paper describes the use of GIS application to strengthen routine immunization in urban areas. Studies is based on the health facility mapping project of Kathmandu Metropolitan City of Nepal conducted by World Health Organization Immunization for Preventable Disease and presented into three parts: Immunization clinic mapping and health facility database development;  Immunization clinic catchment area and hard to reach area delineation; and capacity building and map dissemination.


Decision Making

Presentation Room: Ivy 2, Lobby Level

  • The Fast and the Furious 72: Improving Post-Disaster Humanitarian Assessments
  • Siemon Hollema and Amy Chong, UN World Food Programme

    WFP has developed a new method for its emergency assessments in the 72 hours after a disaster – moving from a reactive to a preemptive approach. Spatial impact and demographic data are combined to determine priority areas for assistance. Field verifications combined with spatial models ensure the assessment is quickly updated, to provide a best estimate snapshot at any time to inform WFP’s response. The method was successfully used in 2015 for the Vanuatu cyclone and the Nepal earthquake.


    Harnessing Data and Spatial Analytics for More Effective Interventions

    Presentation Room: Grand Ballroom I, Lower Lobby Level

    Tanya Bigos, Esri

    The Healthcare market is changing, and with those changes comes new opportunities to bridge the barriers to better population health. To improve healthcare outcomes, organizations need to plan effective interventions that improve the lives of the people they serve and the health of their communities. The first step towards improved interventions is knowing where the greatest need is and the causes of poor healthcare outcomes. This session will provide an introduction to how GIS can play an important role in targeting high risk areas, planning interventions, and determining the key drivers of poor outcomes.

Tuesday, September 15

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1:30 p.m. - 2:30 p.m.

Environmental Health

Location: Library, Lobby Level

  • Identifying the factor of health risk in Cambodia by using GIS
  • Hiroki Kojima, Keio University Japan

    In this paper, we propose a health precaution through visualized using the GIS to identify the factor of health risk of the Cambodian people. Japanese NGO based in Cambodia provided us with the life datas(household meal items, average annual income, drinking water, etc.) obtained by questionnaire survey of about 750 households that are living with children. we analyzed the data over 41 items. From these results, we describe what kind of correlation to the living conditions and health problem.

  • Mapping Tree Canopy to Promote Sun Safety Policies on Elementary School Campuses
  • April Moreno, John Tangenberg, Brian Hilton and June Hilton, Claremont Graduate University

    In researching environmental justice concerns, the Los Angeles (LAUSD) School Shade Tree Canopy Study took place to map over 33,000 trees. The study found that up to 92% of the grounds were susceptible to heat island effect. Tree canopy can provide many health benefits, such as absorbing toxic pollutants from the environment, providing protection from UV radiation, and reducing stress. This can aid in the more effective implementation of sun safety policies to improve environmental health.


Advancing Healthcare

Location: Ivy 1, Lobby Level

  • beaRTAME: Understanding and Adapting to Late or Missed Appointments in Pediatric Care
  • Jefferson McMillan, Children's National Health System

    Missed and late patient appointments can have a major impact on patient satisfaction and care outcomes. Health systems must understand their population to address this issue. At Children’s National, insight has been gained from analyzing large datasets using GIS. Through identification of key variables, CNHS developed more efficient scheduling and reminder models. This report will demonstrate how CNHS hopes to improve efficiency and satisfaction through the integration of GIS.


Community Health

Location: Ivy 2, Lobby Level

  • Leveraging GIS for Better Campus-Community Health
  • Leila Forouzan, Chris Ringewald and Hortensia Amaro, Healthy City

    The State of the Neighborhood project helped USC understand and improve community conditions. Advancement Project used GIS to define study areas around the University Park and Health Sciences Campuses with stakeholders; calculate local health statistics; and map assets identified in focus-groups. Overlay and proximity methods were used in mixed-method research. This work is helpful to those researching population health in a place-based or social determinants of health framework.

  • Population Health and the Virginia Atlas of Community Health
  • Steve Sedlock, Elizabeth Manghi and Steve Horan, GeoHealth Innovations

    Virginia's approach to population health has evolved on two important fronts. First, the Virginia Atlas of Community Health provides the ability to assess population health and develop community-based initiatives. Second, development is underway on Virginia Health Innovation Plan (VHIP), providing guidance on the critical variables and indicators necessary for making Virginia the healthiest state. We will discuss how the Atlas is supporting population health, and the Atlas role in VHIP.

3:00 p.m. - 4:00 p.m.

Service Allocation

Location: Library, Lobby Level

  • Using GIS for Planning Services and Utilities in Jeddah City
  • Abdulkader Murad, King Abdulaziz University

    The purpose of this research is to use GIS for analyzing public services and utilities in Jeddah city, Saudi Arabia. To reach this goal the following objectives were selected: a- Defining the most popular services and utilities that are widely and commonly used among inhabitants, b- Calculating catchment area for each service and utility in every district, and c- Ranking the evaluated districts in terms of their service coverage for public services and utilities.

  • Using Arcgis Server for Organ Allocation Optimization in France
  • Florian Bayer, Agence de la Biomedecine

    In France, organ allocation is handled by the Agence de la biomédecine, a public health organisation. In a context of scarcity, geographical optimization of organ allocation is a sensitive issue. A web application using Arcgis Server has been developed to support and improve the decision making process for patients not taken into account by allocation score. Considering the recipients’ health condition, the distance to the organ donor and the transportation, what is the best allocation option?


Leveraging the ArcGIS Platform to Support Healthy Communities

Presentation Room: Azalea, Lower Lobby Level

Jared Shoultz, Esri

The ArcGIS Platform is being used by Health and Human Services all over the world to promote and maintain Healthy Communities. This workshop will demonstrate how to leverage existing tools such as web maps, configurable templates, analysis capabilities and WebGIS portals to promote data-driven decision making, collaboration and the development of engaging information products. Typical use cases for key Health and Human Services business units will be used as examples to illustrate the value of deploying ArcGIS across an enterprise to enable access to maps and location information when and where it is needed the most.


Mitigating Environmental Risks

Location: Ivy 1, Lobby Level

  • Collaborative Mapping of PM2.5 for Illness Prediction and Prevention
  • Dan Goldberg, Johan Bang, Tracy Hammond, Geoff Jacquez and Katie Jacquez, Texas A & M University

    PM2.5 is known to cause acute and chronic respiratory illnesses and has been linked to cancer. Our system utilizes a citizen-based approach for collecting PM2.5 data at a city level. This system leverages advances in ubiquitous and cheap sensor technologies, emerging CyberGIS infrastructures, and innovative machine learning algorithms to provide individuals and public health professionals with real-time PM2.5 exposure risk maps.

  • Prioritizing Cooling Tower Testing Using Routes Walked by Legionellosis Cases
  • David Lucero, Robert Fitzhenry, Sharon Greene and Karen Landman, New York Department of Health and Mental Hygiene

    Cooling towers potentially harbor Legionella bacteria, the causative agent of legionellosis. To prioritize testing of cooling towers near a cluster of 13 legionellosis cases in a neighborhood, the shortest walking routes along NYC streets from each case’s home and places visited were calculated with Network Analyst. Of 10 cooling towers within 1 mile of cases’ homes, 3 were prioritized for testing that were in the direct walking path of 62% of cases (8 of 13) and 41% of all routes (16 of 39).


Impacting Policy

Location: Ivy 2, Lobby Level

  • Apply GIS to Implement PSE Approach
  • Annette Gardner, Centers for Disease Control and Prevention

    Cancer is the second leading cause of death in the United States. 14 million Americans with a previous cancer diagnosis are living. Economic costs of cancer is burden on communities and health care system. Policy change is an important catalyst of public health systems change. Implementation of effective policy environmental and system change PSE can lead to sustainable systems-level changes to prevent and control cancer.GIS can be apply to identify communities and capacity to implement PSE.

  • Using GIS to Impact Tobacco Policy in Colorado Springs
  • Kate Watkins, El Paso County Public Health

    Colorado’s tobacco law inhibits taxing or licensing cigarettes. To circumnavigate this law communities are enacting non-cigarette tobacco licenses. To impact policy, a map series was published, including a density distribution of tobacco retailer (TR) locations, tobacco advertising placement and volume in relationship to schools and low socioeconomic neighborhoods, and a hotspot analysis of TR sales violations. A sampling scheme was also developed to assess all TR for youth sale violations.

4:30 p.m. - 5:00 p.m.

Leveraging the ArcGIS Platform to Support Healthy Communities, continued

Presentation Room: Azalea, Lower Lobby Level

Jared Shoultz, Esri

The ArcGIS Platform is being used by Health and Human Services all over the world to promote and maintain Healthy Communities. This workshop will demonstrate how to leverage existing tools such as web maps, configurable templates, analysis capabilities and WebGIS portals to promote data-driven decision making, collaboration and the development of engaging information products. Typical use cases for key Health and Human Services business units will be used as examples to illustrate the value of deploying ArcGIS across an enterprise to enable access to maps and location information when and where it is needed the most.


Supporting Healthcare Reform

Location: Ivy 1, Lobby Level

  • The Medicare Data Portal & Accountable Care Organization (ACO) Explorer

    Michael Topmiller, Mark Carrozza, Jene Grandmont, Paul Maliszewski and Jennifer Rankin, American Academy of Family Physicians

    We present two web-based GISs that put the power of geographic visualization in the hands of researchers. In addition to creating maps, the Medicare Data Portal allows users to perform bivariate spatial visualizations to explore data. The ACO Explorer allows for statistical analyses for exploring relationships between ACO quality measures and population health indicators. Together, they offer researchers tools for understanding complex Medicare datasets and developing new research questions.

Wednesday, September 16

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9:00 a.m. - 10:30 a.m.

Creating Great Apps using Application Templates, Web AppBuilder, and Story Maps

Location: Azalea, Lobby Level

Bern Szukalski, Esri

It’s easier than ever before to make and share great web maps, but you can take those maps to the next level and create great applications that inform, tell stories, or provide needed tools to support workflows – all with no programming required. A wide variety of hosted application templates and builders are available via ArcGIS Online to help you share your maps and reach your target audience. Whether you’re communicating privately with colleagues, or reaching out to a public audience, this workshop will enable you to discover, use, and author great applications. Topics covered will include:

  • Configuring web application templates
  • Authoring Story Maps
  • Using Web AppBuilder for ArcGIS
  • Tips for managing your web applications
  • Doing more with web application templates
  • Attend this workshop and you’ll be empowered with everything you need to know to author your own powerful custom-configured applications, and get more out of your web maps.