ArcNews Online
 

Spring 2005
Search ArcNews
 

E-mail to a Friend

Nepal, South Korea, Utah—Esri T-Shirts Rule the World Over!

Drew Stephens
Drew Stephens
Drew Stephens, president of AllPoints GIS, Inc. (Boulder, Colorado), is at Kalapatthar, Nepal (18,600 feet high and 10 degrees F!). From left to right: Mt. Everest West Shoulder, Mt. Everest, and Nuptse. The Khumbu Ice Fall is visible below the West Shoulder. Drew and two friends were the invited guests of Ed Viesturs, a Mountain Hardwear athlete who is currently on a quest to climb all 14 of the world's highest mountains (above 8,000 meters/26,000 feet) without the use of supplemental oxygen. Well, all we can say is that it's a good thing he remembered to wear his circa 1990 ArcInfo T-shirt.

 

Mary Durward and Park Yung-Seong
Mary Durward and Park Yung-Seong
Mary Durward, retired county assessor, St. Louis County, Minnesota, and her friend, Park Yung-Seong, director of Urban Management for Kang Buk-Gu, Seoul, Metropolitan Government, South Korea, were at the top of Puram Mountain in Seoul, South Korea, when this photo was snapped. Their matching Esri T-shirts are most impressive!

David Sinton
David Sinton
David Sinton, GIS technician at Zion National Park, Utah, was kayaking on the Green River deep in Utah's Labyrinth Canyon when he posed for this Esri T-shirt photo.

 





Check out more Esri T-Shirt pictures in the new expanded section below.

Expanded T-Shirts

Jack Haefner
Jack Haefner
 
Jack Haefner, chief of Operations of one of only two active duty topographic mapping battalions in the U.S. Army, and his wife, Toni, were escaping recently to the lava flows at Hawaii Volcanoes National Park on the Big Island. Jack's background in geology made his posting to Hawaii a marriage made in heaven. His Esri T-shirt added to the charm, as well, we're sure!
William Harmon
William Harmon
 
William Harmon, GIS specialist, Department of Transportation, City of San Jose, California, is wearing his Esri T-shirt at the MAP ROOM of the Reunification Palace in Ho Chi Minh City (formerly Saigon), Vietnam. He says, "I had intentionally brought my shirt hoping that I would get a picture wearing it in a unique place. I thought that the old map room there (preserved from the days prior to 1975) would be appropriate—although the maps on the wall of course predate any computer-aided mapping. I did see the picture of the guy skydiving but thought that that was too much for me to do, scare me to death on the way down before I even hit the ground!"

Wear an Esri T-shirt in a unique location and send a photograph to ArcNews. While digital photos sent via e-mail (tmiller@esri.com) are preferred, prints or slides can be sent to Thomas K. Miller, ArcNews Editor, ArcNews T-Shirt Feature, Esri, 380 New York Street, Redlands, California 92373-8100, USA.

Contact Us | Privacy | Legal | Site Map