[an error occurred while processing this directive] [an error occurred while processing this directive]
 

Korea National GIS Initiative

From September 28-29, 2000, the fifth GIS International Seminar was held in Seoul, Korea. Organized by the Korea Research Institute for Human Settlements flag of Korea(KRIHS) and sponsored by the Institute of Information Technology Assessment (IITA), the seminar was titled "Toward a Knowledge-Based Society: National GIS Policy and Technological Development." International representatives attended the seminar from Esri, the Ordnance Survey, and the Australian Surveying and Land Information Group, in addition to Korean experts in the GIS field. The seminar was a premier event in national GIS development in Korea and focused on the past and future national GIS (NGIS) effort in the country.

The Korean government is taking a leadership role in developing a public and private national GIS program for the country. Korea initiated The First National GIS Master Plan in 1995. Based on this plan, several GIS projects and research works have been initiated such as digital topographic and thematic mapping, GIS technology development, GIS standardization and human resource development, GIS application system, and others. "The Second National GIS Master Plan," a five-year master plan that starts in 2001, is actively taking shape. The second five-year plan will focus on eight areas, such as establishment of a distribution system for spatial data and the use of GIS applications, among others.

The Korean NGIS structure was reformed in 2000 with the objective of using GIS in all public and private disciplines within the next five years. Now under the Minister of Construction and Transportation, the NGIS consists of seven subcommittees responsible for areas such as human resource development, development of data distribution technologies, cadastral systems, standards development, surveying, and related technologies.

Building on the first master plan, which focused on the development of key public utilization systems, data standards, and human resource development, the Korean national GIS effort is fast becoming one of the most visible and progressive national GIS programs worldwide.

For more information, contact Jerry Johnson, Esri (e-mail: esri@batelco.com.bh).

See also "Building National GIS Infrastructures Using the Geography Network."

ArcNews home page


[an error occurred while processing this directive]