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About Carlton

An eighth-generation Floridian, National Geographic explorer Carlton Ward Jr. uses photography to inspire conservation of his home state's nature and culture. Carlton founded the Florida Wildlife Corridor campaign in 2010 to build public support for corridor science and keeping Florida wild.

With fellow explorers Mallory Lykes Dimmitt and Joe Guthrie, he has since trekked more than 2,000 miles through the corridor, during two National Geographic-supported expeditions, to showcase a statewide vision to protect Florida's wild places. Both expeditions produced award-winning books, PBS films, and widespread outreach. His current National Geographic project, Path of the Panther, is using sophisticated camera traps and intimate photojournalism to create an unprecedented glimpse into the life of one America's most endangered and elusive predators.

Carlton is the author of four books, and his photographs have been published widely, including in National Geographic, Audubon, Smithsonian, and Nature Conservancy magazines. Carlton has received the Conservation Leadership Award from the Fish & Wildlife Foundation of Florida and the Rolex Artist-in-Exploration Award from the Explorers Club.

Presentation abstract

Florida Wild: Hidden in Plain Sight

Author, photographer, conservationist, and National Geographic explorer Carlton Ward Jr. has roots in Florida that go back eight generations. He uses his photography of bears and panthers to inspire conservation of his beloved home state's nature and culture. As founder of the Florida Wildlife Corridor project, Carlton campaigns for public support to connect, protect and restore the statewide network of lands and waters that support Florida's wildlife and people. Carlton has trekked more than 2,000 miles through the corridor, during two National Geographic-supported missions, producing the award-winning photography and books that illustrate the importance of giving wildlife room to roam. Now embarking on his most important journey, Carlton aims to accelerate the rate of conservation in Florida. His current National Geographic project, Path of the Panther, focuses on one of the world's most elusive and endangered carnivores to show how the Florida panther can help us save the Corridor and keep the Everglades connected to the rest of America. 


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