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Tuesday, November 6

Time Session Title Description Track Location
8:00 am - 5:00 pm  Registration     Atrium
7:30 am - 8:30 am  Continental Breakfast     Atrium
8:30 am - 10:00 am Insights for ArcGIS with Ocean Data   Esri Technical Session Auditorium
Bathymetric Mapping and Data Analysis Made Easy   Esri Technical Session Room B
ArcGIS Pro Basics for Science   Esri Technical Session M1- Triplex
8:30 am - 5:00 pm  Hands on Learning Lab   Hands-On Learning Lab Q1wD
10:00 am - 10:30 am  Networking Break     Atrium
10:30 am - 12:00 pm  nsights for ArcGIS with Ocean Data (cont)  
  Esri Technical Session
Auditorium
Bathymetric Mapping and Data Analysis Made Easy  (cont)
  Esri Technical Session
Room B 
ArcGIS Pro Basics for Science (cont)
  Esri Technical Session
M1-Triplex
12:00 pm - 1:30 pm  Lunch (attendees on their own)      
1:30 pm - 3:00 pm Field Data Capture with Survey123   Esri Technical Session
Auditorium
Field Data Capture with Survey123 
  Esri Technical Session
Room B
Advanced Analytical Workflows for Ocean Science 
  Esri Technical Session
M1-Triplex
3:00 pm - 3:30 pm  Networking Break     Atrium 
3:30 pm - 5:00 pm Field Data Capture with Survey123 (cont) 
  Esri Technical Session
Auditorium
Web AppBuilder and Configurable Apps (cont) 
  Esri Technical Session
Room B
Advanced Analytical Workflows for Ocean Science (cont) 
  Esri Technical Session
M1-Triplex

Wednesday, November 7

Time Session Title Description Track Location
7:30 am - 5:00 pm  Registration     Atrium
7:30 am - 8:30 am  Continental Breakfast     Atrium
8:30 am - 10:00 am  Plenary Session Welcome - Drew Stephens
Protocol Opening - Kimokeo Kapahulehua
Esri's Ocean Commitment - Jack Dangermond
Keynote Address - Dr. Timothy Hawthorne 
Plenary  Auditorium
10:00 am - 10:30 am  Networking Break     Atrium
10:30 am - 11:45 am  Plenary (cont) Esri's Science Mission - Dawn Wright
Ecological Coastal Units - Dawn Wright, Roger Sayre, Sean Bryer
Ocean Health from the Next Generation
Plenary Auditorium
11:45 am - 12:00 pm  Group Photo     Steps of Building Q
12:00 pm - 1:30 pm  Hosted Lunch     Esri Cafe
1:30 pm - 5:00 pm  Hands-On Learning Lab   Hands-On Learning Lab Q1wD
1:30 pm - 3:00 pm  Drones, ROV's and AUV's 
Salt Marsh Restoration Monitoring using Drone Imagery
Alexandra Lapides (Elkhorn Slough Foundation) 

Salt marshes provide a number of critical ecosystem functions, but only thrive in a narrow elevation range. As part of an effort to raise 61 acres of flooded salt marsh habitat, we used an Unmanned Aerial Vehicle (UAV) to monitor the restoration. In early stages UAV imagery allowed us to track construction and weekly environmental changes. Now we continue to collect imagery as part of long-term monitoring for the area. With GIS we use a supervised classifier to quantify vegetation extent, which is necessary to lock in sediment and provide habitat. Additionally, we create digital elevation models (DEMs) to track sediment movement and ensure the marsh remains within the critical elevation range. DEMs also allows us to create various projected flood scenarios. The use of GIS software allows us to understand and quantify ecosystem variations as part of a massive, multi-year restoration effort and gives us valuable insight into a vital ecosystem. 

Creating Seafloor 2D/3D Image Maps Using ROV Video
Yuko Yokozawa (University of Redlands) 

In the vast ocean floor, there are not many data available particularly not for the colored image which covered a wide area. By producing such image, a variety of image analyzing can be performed such as vegetation information and finding a new species on the ocean floor. Using Photogrammetry software, underwater video footage can be digitized, and from the digitized video, the ocean floor image map and also the 3D products can be produced for later image analysis of the ocean floor.  From the 3D image of the seafloor, marine biologists easily identify the species and may be able to find a new species. 


Spatial Storytelling with Drones and Interviews along the Mesoamerican Reef  
Patricia Bencivenga  (University of Central Florida) 

We combine drone imagery with spatial storytelling to explain impacts on and adaptations to a changing environment on Belize Barrier Reef islands. Our key research question is:   how are island communities impacted by and adapting to development, environmental degradation, and climate change?   We report on our openly available GIS data portal of the Belize Barrier Reef islands that includes up-to-date high-resolution imagery and GIS data about structures, docks, island polygons, alternative energy sources, sea walls, shoreline erosion, and mangrove loss. In addition, we engage in spatial storytelling with local residents to represent and share local knowledge about the islands to complement the drone imagery. Drone2Map is utilized to create orthomosaics from the drone imagery collected, and ArcGIS Online is used to create annotated maps. The mixed-method approach allows our team to better understand community needs and adaptations along the world’s second largest
reef. 


Marine Protected Area Online Mapping Tool for Spatial Planning 
Mark Rankin (Ocean Networks Canada) 

The Endeavour Hydrothermal Vents Marine Protected Area (MPA) is 250 km west of Vancouver Island, British Columbia, at 2250 m depth. Since discovered in 1982, scientists have studied this unique environment. Fisheries and Oceans Canada (DFO) designated this area as the first MPA in Canada in 2003 and are responsible for monitoring activities. In 2009, instruments for the NEPTUNE observatory operated by Ocean Networks Canada (ONC) were deployed. ONC started producing an ESRI geodatabase for DFO MPA management in 2014 that uses submersible data and annotations, marine infrastructure, samples, surveys, and third-party content. Comprehensive metadata and resources (e.g., video) are provided. In 2018, ONC added an online map using ESRI technology for improved access. The technology summarizes large amounts of data in an informative display for management priorities (e.g., target species) and ecosystem stressors (e.g., sampling, debris). 
User Presentations Auditorium 
 1:30 pm - 3:30 pm  Coastal Management, Marine Spatial Planning, and Marine Debris 
Dimar Geographic Information System - Exploring the Oceans and Coasts of Colombia 
Paola Echeverry (Dirección General Marítima) 

The technological developments in earth sciences for the knowledge of the coastal marine territory, and the application of the geospatial technologies of Esri, allows the Colombian Maritime Authority to generate, analyze, edit and share information to guarantee a holistic knowledge management in order to make an accurate decision making. 
   
The Geographic Information System (SIGDimar) becomes an indispensable instrument to achieve the integral vision and consolidate the integral knowledge of the Colombian coastal marine territory, through the interrelation of the coastal, oceanographic and hydrographic issues, with the technical and scientific rigor, providing the means for the organization, access and use of the data, recognizing the potential of geographic information in a holistic way as a support to the formulation of policies, decision-making
and the development of the functions of the Colombian Maritime Authority. 

Spatio-temporal Mapping of Mangroves for Government Coastal planning, Abu Dhabi 
Helena Schindler-Dite (TCarta)
 
Mangroves are significant in the context of climate change and estimated to sequester 83% of the global oceanic carbon storage, despite occupying only 2% of intertidal habitats.   Environment Agency Abu Dhabi (EAD) in collaboration with TCarta Consultancy LLC and Consilium utilized Worldview-2/3 imagery with GIS analysis to map   Avicennia marina and Arthrocnemum macrostachyum   along the entire Abu Dhabi coastline.   A temporal series of mangrove extents was created to quantify changes between 1987 and 2017. ArcGISPro was used to calculate the biophysical health parameters of the crown and stands down to the tree level using vector statistical analysis. Temporal change detection used intersection analysis and was scaled up using ArcPy, enabling the process to be repeated in future iterations.  TCarta quantified mangrove health spatial distribution with up to 90% accuracy.This aids EAD identify mangroves requiring protection and provides a powerful tool to inform decision making. 

Samish Indian Nation Department of Natural Resources' Efforts to Remove Marine Debris and Creosote using GIS in the San Juan Archipelago, Washington State 
Casey Palmer-McGee (Samish Indian Nation) 

Samish Indian Nation has been removing creosote and marine debris from Samish Traditional Territory since 2014. Through strong partnerships and pre-removal data collection, we have removed over 580,000lbs. In 2017, we began using GPS units to record location, time, date, dimensions, and imagery of marine debris before summer removal. This new method helps us map and prioritize cleanup of the largest contaminated sites and has made our removal operation more efficient. This is an ongoing project. 


Risk Assessment of Vessel-cetacean Collisions in the Exclusive Economic Zone of Colombia: A Tool for Marine Spatial Planning
Christian Bermudez-Rivas (General Maritime Directorate - Colombia) 

The expansion of global trade and maritime traffic pose a threat to cetacean populations due to collisions with vessels. To reduce the risk of collisions inside the areas of the EEZ of Colombia, a habitat suitability model was made using the non-parametric maximum entropy algorithm (MaxEnt), which is supported by environmental variables for 10 cetacean species which are frequently reported to collide with vessels.      

With the models created, a GIS was built with ArcGIS® in order to visualize the overlap of the busiest maritime routes with those areas considered the most suitable habitats for the 10 cetacean species in Colombia. A multi-criteria system was then used to identify areas with the highest risk of collision in order to make adjustments to the maritime routes that presented the greatest risk. Such changes are made without affecting navigation efficiency and support tighter national maritime regulation as part of Colombia’s role as a coastal nation. 


Mapping Marine Debris with Mixed-Methods in Belize 
Amber Rutstein (University of Central Florida) 

We analyzed natural and man-made debris accumulation along the coast of Hopkins Village, Belize. The research included quantitative data analysis of the material composition on the beaches as well as qualitative data regarding community perception of the natural debris and litter. The marine debris data collected helped to create a various array of maps that are publicly available online for anyone to use. For the quantitative data collected, the maps included coastal land use data along the Hopkins shoreline as well as the primary, secondary and tertiary debris types found on the beach and at marine debris hot spot piles. The maps created with the help of interviews and community insight showed areas along the Hopkins shoreline where residents perceived high amounts of litter to be and also data regarding the most visited areas of the Hopkins coastline. The work has implications for how community members can contribute to studies of marine debris through a mixed-method approach. 
User Presentations  Room B
3:00 pm - 3:30 pm  Networking Break     Atrium
3:30 pm - 5:00 pm  Lightning Talks Maintaining the Offshore Cadastre in the 21st Century 
Jeremy Smith (Bureau of Ocean Energy Management)
 
Since the 1990’s, the Bureau of Ocean Energy Management (BOEM) has maintained the offshore cadastre in a highly customized, non-spatial database management system that is unable to compute boundaries or areas in a World Geodetic System (WGS 84)-based cadastre.    BOEM, in partnership with Esri,   as developed a GIS that requires no customization and delivers accurate and time-saving results for managing the offshore cadastre.  Consequently, BOEM has published map products offshore of the Hawaiian Islands for the very first time using ArcGIS and its suite of geoprocessing tools.

Monte Carlo Style Geographically Weighted Regression: A Peak at Technique 
Wesley Clary (University of New Mexico) 

The Gulf of Alaska is a complex environment, where geologic processes have formed a variety of features including troughs, canyons, channels, gullies, and their structures. We measured feature shape characteristics to assess relationships between drainage morphology, glaciomarine, and fault processes. Principal component analysis of fifteen parameters guided geographically weighted regression (GWR) using four proxy variables for ice sheets, faults, and instability. The GWR coefficients provide estimates of the influence of each parameter locally and regionally. Our results, combined with the interpretation of geophysical data provide insight into the combination of geologic processes operating on the shelf-slope. Ice sheet extent explains the most drainage shape variation regionally, but the distance from an instability zone was the strongest local correlation; the fault coefficient was largest near the Transition fault where deformation has resulted in variable seafloor topography and slope failure. 

GIS-based Multi-criteria Evaluation Methodology to Support Ecosystem-based Coastal Zone Planning 
Keshav Paudel (UiT The Arctic University of Norway) 

The concept of ecosystem-based coastal zone planning has been increasingly advocated over the last decade for sustainable management of coastal space in a multi-user context.  However, mapping ecosystem services (ES) provided by diverse and complex coastal areas and incorporating it into decision-making and spatial planning is not trivial. With the help of northern Norway case study, I present here a simple method of mapping marine ecosystem services and a GIS-based spatial multi-criteria evaluation method, which can be easily replicable by technicians and planners, for an integrated assessment of spatial planning trade-off with aquaculture using existing biophysical data and participatory mapping. 

Identifying Archaeological Shipwrecks on the Goodwin Sands through Bathymetry Analysis 
Elizabeth Kruger (Northwestern University) 

The Goodwin Sands has long been a major navigation hazard. This study, completed in September 2016, furthered previous efforts to map the many shipwrecks in the area by utilizing recent bathymetric surveys to update the wreck database created during the English Heritage AMAP2 project. The bathymetric data were analyzed to independently confirm the presence of known wrecks and locate previously undocumented ones. Two wrecks listed in the AMAP2 database, the SS Ira and the Luray Victory, were flagged as potentially misidentified, and alternate identifications are suggested. 

Utilizing Online Geospatial Tools to Guide Ocean Exploration and Discovery 
Andrew Shuler (CSS, Inc)
 
Deep-sea corals and sponges provide essential fish habitat throughout US national waters, but these unseen habitats are increasingly subject to degradation from multiple threats creating an urgent need for the data required to manage these species.  NOAA’s Deep-Sea Coral Research and Technology Program is sponsoring a 4-year initiative, Southeast Deep Coral Initiative (SEDCI), to explore and document deep-sea coral and sponge ecosystems in the southeastern US SEDCI relies heavily on shared online GIS products to facilitate expedition planning and communicate data.  A geodatabase was developed to display known coral and sponge locations, ROV dives, managed area boundaries, and multibeam maps.  The online platforms effectively crowdsources expedition planning and can fast track delivery of data to resource managers. This presentation will demonstrate the online GIS tools and illustrate its utility in the planning of upcoming telepresence expeditions in the Caribbean Sea and Southeast US. 

Employing the Use of AUVs and GIS for Environmental Monitoring
Olivia Hughes (Orca Maritime, Inc.)

Using public vector data and AUV imagery datasets, we are developing a base environmental GIS to highlight the use of cutting-edge data collection and mapping technology in environmental monitoring. This comprehensive environmental GIS aides in making informed environmental decisions by storing pertinent environmental datasets in one easily accessible location. When sonar imagery, water quality imagery, bathymetry, and vector data come together a true picture of San Diego Bay’s environment comes together.

Lightning Talks Auditorium 
5:00 pm - 7:00 pm  Expo Social     Atrium 

Thursday, November 8

Time Session Title Description Track Location
7:30 am - 5:00 pm  Registration      Atrium 
7:30 am - 8:30 am  Continental Breakfast     Atrium 
8:30 am - 10:00 am  Technical Plenary New 3D Interpolation Tools
Space Time Analysis of Historical Algal Blooms
Applications of Spatial Machine Learning
Analytical Use Cases of Living Atlas and Esri Base Map Content 
Plenary Auditorium
10:00 am - 10:30 am  Networking Break     Atrium
10:30 am - 12:00 pm  New Information and Tools The State of Protected Areas 
Living Atlas Update - Vector Ocean Basemap, Antartic Basemap, Clorophyll
S-100 and Beyond - Hydrography for Ocean Science
3D Countoring for Bathymetry and the Bathy Server
Image Services for Seafloor Mapping
SeaBed 2030 Workflows
Insights for Ocean Science
  Auditorium 
12:00 pm - 1:30 pm  Hosted Lunch     Esri Cafe
1:30 pm - 5:00 pm  Hands-On Learning Lab   Hands-On Learning Lab Q1wD
1:30 pm - 3:00 pm  Collaborative Tools and Technology  Using GIS to Incorporate Transit Surveys into NOAA Mapping Operations 
Paul Turner (NOAA)

As NOAA pushes out on its ocean mapping goals, one promising effort in work is the development of a process for NOAA’s vessels to acquire ocean mapping data during transits.  Using GIS for route planning against priority data layers, NOAA can make better use of standard transits between project areas to collect bathymetry,   along with water column and acoustic backscatter data  . Transit route surveys will provide an additional source of seabed mapping data to supplement current bathymetric coverage and fill in gaps where bathymetric data is scarce.  

With GIS and layers that indicate bathymetric grid cell data gaps, hydrographic surveying priorities and environmental compliance factors, NOAA can route plan much more effectively to make use of the transits between ports and projects.  Keeping a database of routes taken can make the planning tool smarter, so that the next route can step over to collect a parallel line and avoid recollecting the same track. 

Will Colombia’s Marine Protected Areas Fulfill their Functions in Different Climate Change scenarios? Building an Evaluation Model with GIS 
Christian Bermudez Rivas (General Maritime Directorate - Colombia) 

Habitat suitability modelling, based on the maximum entropy algorithm, was used to evaluate four species of particular conservation interest within the protected areas of the Caribbean and the Colombian Pacific: the hawksbill turtle ( Eretmochelys   imbricata ), the scalloped hammerhead shark ( Sphyrna lewini ), the staghorn coral ( Acropora cervicornis ) and the humpback whale ( Megaptera novaeangliae ). These were evaluated under two possible climate change scenarios (RCP 2.6 and RCP 8.5), for present and future projections.     From these models and the protected marine areas, a GIS was built to map the extent of  suitable habitat for these species under the climate scenarios. The overlap of the marine conservation areas with suitable habitat for the four species analyzed, found that in the worst case scenarios of climate change (RCP 8.5), the marine protected areas will not conserve an extended suitable habitat for all species, in  particularly the staghorn coral and the hammerhead shark. 

Applying Esri ArcGIS Online Tools for Coastal Management Applications 
Heather Vollmer (APTIM) 

Having immediate access to concise spatial and temporal data is a critical component to managing coastal environments. ESRI ArcGIS Online tools provide a platform for data sharing that increases accessibility and understanding.  For example, web applications allow for data scalability making local to regional data easier to display and comprehend as well as provide transparency in project management. Field Survey 123 can  make complex surveys easier to manage within the field and Data Collector not only provides consistency in field collection, but also allows real time access to the data. In conclusion, ESRI’s Online technology improves collaboration among coastal management stakeholders by providing consistent real time data. Successful implementation of these tools relies on adequate communication and flexibility from the design team. 

U.S. Ocean Reporting Tool 
Christine Taylor (Bureau of Ocean Energy Management)  

BOEM and NOAA announce the release of the Ocean Reporting Tool (ORT), a web-based, automated spatial analysis tool for US ocean activities. This web application allows users to draw or select a location of interest and quickly obtain over 80 unique infographics calculated on-the-fly, to determine if an ocean space is suitable for an activity.  Users can select infographics of interest, explore ocean data, share results, and print reports for various permitting processes. Infographics are organized into categories including a general site profile, energy and minerals, natural resources and conservation, transportation and infrastructure, biophysical and oceanographic (including Esri EMU data), and economics and commerce. The ORT draws from the largest compilation of US ocean data to-date, encompassing a wealth of data layers which have been processed for optimal spatial and temporal resolution. To use the ORT visit    https://marinecadastre.gov/ort/   


Geospatial Decision Support for the Flower Garden Banks 
Dan Dorfman (NOAA NOS NOCCOS)

The NOAA National Centers for Coastal Ocean Science provided geospatial decision support for the Flower Garden Banks National Marine Sanctuary boundary expansion process. This work included engagement with the Boundary Expansion Working Group (BEWG). Through a series of 12 meetings, we led representatives from various stakeholder groups through a biogeographic assessment process. During this we integrated information on both the biology/ecology and human uses for a series of banks in the northern Gulf of Mexico. We integrated biological observations from over 550 survey dives along with information on potential conflicts, such as fishing, shipping, or oil & gas extraction. We applied a geospatial decision support tool called Marxan and then conducted a participatory GIS process. This enabled us to review biological and ecological features along with potential conflicts in a geographic context and to draw lines on the map to create a proposal for expanding the sanctuary boundaries. 
User Presentation Auditorium
Ocean Community, History, and Storytelling Sonar Stories: NOAA's Hydrographic Survey Projects Story Map 
Meredith Payne (NOAA) 

In 2018, NOAA's Hydrographic Surveys Division revamped their story map in order to reach a broader audience. The resulting story map comprises nested Cascade and Journal story maps that are updated throughout the field season to reveal the progressing coverage at each of the planned survey sites. For each project, survey details are combined with narrative that explains the significance of each site, appealing to hydrographic data stakeholders, regional managers, and informal learners alike. Pop-ups configured in the underlying map services allow the user to examine preliminary depth values, providing an interactive experience. The multimedia story map also offers general background information about NOAA hydrographic surveys and sonar technology.

We want to keep improving this story map! The Esri Ocean GIS Forum is an ideal venue to showcase it and to receive feedback from an assembly of subject matter experts. Audience suggestions can help us further enhance our user experience. 

Inventing the Grand Banks: Humanities GIS, and Cartesian Perceptions of North-West Atlantic Fisheries ca 1504-ca 1787 
Charles Travis (University of Texas, Arlington) 

This paper presents GIS visualizations and analyses of north-west Atlantic sea-charts produced between 1504 and 1787. Such charts contributed to the cross-cultural and trans-national cartographical ‘invention’ of the Grand Banks during the era of the ‘Fish Revolution’ (1400-1700) 

Assessing Coastal Threats to Archaeological Sites at Loíza, Puerto Rico 
Loderay Bracero Marrero (Environmental Sciences Department, University of Puerto Rico, Rio Piedras) 

This research aims to preliminary assess how archaeological sites are impacted by erosion, sea level rise, flooding and storm surges. The study area is the Loíza’s coast  in  the north-eastern region of Puerto Rico. Loíza’s coast is diverse, containing sandy beaches, mangroves, dunes and  eolianite  areas.    There are recorded around 150 archaeological sites in this municipality, from which 100 are within 1 km from the  coastline.    

Several remote sensing and GIS techniques will be applied using ArcGIS 10.6. Digital Shoreline Analysis (DSAS) from USGS will be used to evaluate erosion. NOAA’s mapping techniques will be employed to assess the sea level rise, flooding and storm  surge .    Drones will be used to create  high-resolution  Digital Elevation Model (DEM) using Drone2Map.   
 
Finally, once the vulnerability of archaeological sites to erosion, sea level rise, flooding and storm surges  are  evaluated, these data will be valuable for environme ntal and cultural resource management. 

Participatory GIS to Examine Flooding in a Coastal Village
Sara Peluso (University of Central Florida) 

We examine flooding  in Hopkins Village, Belize. Our community-based GIS work is structured around questions  from village council concerns and collecting information directly from those  living in the village. We use ArcCollector to gather structure and culvert data  around the village, as well as ArcMap to create  participatory sketch maps  including information with community members on where  tanding water is perceived in the village, what direction the water tends to flow in, and where  people want to see drainage infrastructure installed in the village. We analyze  the data to create baseline geospatial data and maps for  the community, in  hopes that the data can  someday be used to make changes in the community  involving flooding infrastructure. 

Engaging the Public on Marine Protection Issues using GIS 
Ross Jameson (Canadian Parks and Wilderness Society - BC Chapter) 

Environmental organizations with conservation initiatives and campaigns for marine protection have a unique barrier: how does one visit and engage with a marine park? How can we strategically campaign and organize the public for the protection of a marine area that nobody may ever visit or experience? Canadian Parks and Wilderness Society (CPAWS) is combining social media and maps as well as ArcOnline tools (StoryMaps, Survey123) to connect people to marine spaces and conservation issues otherwise inaccessible.  The power and flexibility of these tools allow CPAWS to effectively communicate with our networks while customizing the necessary level of information. Using these tools, CPAWS has promoted the creation of MPAs by soliciting action from our networks and educating the public. 
 User Presentations Room B
3:00 pm - 3:30 pm  Networking Break     Atrium
3:30 pm - 5:00 pm  Seafloor Modeling and Ecosystems  Utilizing GIS to Identify Black Rockfish Habitat in Southeast Alaska 
Kelii Wood (Alaska Department of Fish and Game) 

The Alaska Department of Fish & Game (ADF&G) currently manages black rockfish (Sebastes melanops) in the absence of fishery independent data. GIS was used to create a habitat suitability model & identify important habitat for black rockfish in a portion of Southeast Alaska. The Benthic Terrain Modeler was used to transform bathymetric data into a terrain ruggedness layer to identify areas of sea floor roughness. A Thiessen polygon tool was chosen to estimate substrate from points acquired from the National Oceanic & Atmospheric Administration (NOAA) & ADF&G. Each of the three rasters were layered with known locations of black rockfish to identify suitability criteria. Each raster was reclassed, combined & processed using weighted overlay to create a final habitat suitability map. The final layer identified five ranked suitability classes (low to high suitability) for black rockfish in Southeast Alaska. Results from this model are used to identify key habitat for future surveys. 

Characterization of Underwater Ecosystems 
Juan David Santana Mejía (Center for Caribbean Oceanographic and Hydrographic Research (CIOH)) 

Technological advances nowadays are useful to collect precise information regarding geomorphologic seabed characteristics that determine the distribution of marine biodiversity, facilitating the prediction of their spatial patterns. This data can be analyzed applying the ArcGIS, Benthic Terrain Modeler extension. As a result, in this study we assess  the capacity of the BTM for discriminating benthic habitats along the Cartagena coast and for providing baseline maps for future monitoring of the changes and evolution of marine environments in the region. Multibeam sonar data were used in combination with checkpoint ground sampling collected with a Remotely Operated Underwater vehicle and classified using the BTM. Results shows that the information provided by these methods are useful tools for stakeholder’s engagement with which to made participatory and informed ecological, social and economic decisions and for monitoring activities along the Colombian coasts. 

Modeling Threat of Runoff to Coastal Ocean Environments using an Open Source Initiative 
Paige Hoel (UC Santa Barbara) 

Technological advances nowadays are useful to collect precise information regarding geomorphologic seabed characteristics that determine the distribution of marine biodiversity, facilitating the prediction of their spatial patterns. This data can be analyzed applying the ArcGIS, Benthic Terrain Modeler extension. As a result, in this study we assess the capacity of the BTM for discriminating benthic habitats along the  Cartagena coast and for providing baseline maps for future monitoring of the changes and evolution of marine environments in the region. Multibeam sonar data were used in combination with checkpoint  ground sampling collected with a Remotely Operated Underwater vehicle and classified using the BTM. Results shows that the information provided by these methods are useful tools for stakeholder’s engagement with which to made participatory and informed ecological, social and economic decisions and for monitoring activities along the Colombian coasts. 

Channel Morphometry - How It Differs on Land and in the Ocean 
Perna Ramesh (National Centre for Antarctic and Ocean Research) 

Comparison of fluvial rivers submarine channels has been deliberated upon since channels were first identified on ocean floors. By now, most of the major submarine fans with their integral complexes have been mapped and studied. On first look, almost every submarine channel appears similar to rivers. However, given the vastly disparate environments, careful examination must be performed before establishing an analogy. Here, we present a one-to-one comparison of fluvial/subamrinne rivers from the same river system – the Indus using GIS. DEMs of the Indus Basin have been compared with bathymetric data of the Indus Fan – based on longitudinal profiling, sectional analysis, channel width and sinuosity behavior. ArcGIS® 10.5 was extensively used,  especially, the Spatial and 3D analyst toolboxes to extract stream network from +75 DEMs; stream characteristics; basin/hypsometric analysis; building terrain models etc. This study demonstrates the novelty GIS for landform and ocean mapping. 

Drainage Cross Section Shape in the Gulf of Alaska: A Regional Result of Glacial, Marine, and Tectonic Processes 
Wesley Clary (University of New Mexico) 

The Gulf of Alaska is a complex environment, where geologic processes have formed a variety of features including troughs, canyons, channels, gullies, and other structures. We measured feature shape characteristics to assess relationships between drainage morphology, glaciomarine, and fault processes. Principal component analysis of fifteen parameters guided geographically weighted regression (GWR) using four proxy variables for ice sheets, faults, and instability. The GWR coefficients provide estimates of the influence of  ach parameter locally and regionally. Our results, combined with interpretation of geophysical data provide insight into the combination of geologic processes operating on the shelf-slope. Ice sheet extent explains the most drainage shape variation regionally, but the distance from an instability zone was the strongest local correlation; the fault coefficient was largest near the Transition fault where deformation has resulted in variable seafloor topography and slope failure. 
 User Presentations Auditorium 
5:00 pm - 5:30 pm  Closing Session     Auditorium

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